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Recruiting Guidelines

Recruiting Guidlines

Decisions:
The recruiting process can be a very tough and stressful time for families. There are a lot of factors that go into making a decision as to what college to attend. Hopefully, the information here will make the process a little easier.
NCAA Eligibility Guidelines; http://eligibilitycenter.org/ECWR2/NCAA_EMS/NCAA_EMS.html#

NCAA Recruiting Center:
http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/future 

RECRUITING COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES:
Take a proactive approach and research the college programs that you want to attend.

Target the schools that are an athletic and academic match for you

Reduce the number of potential schools to 50 or so from the 1,400 colleges in the nation that offer a baseball program
Gather information on the internet regarding universities and their athletic programs. You can also speak with your guidance counselor; look through the Peterson's 4 year college Guide or The Sports Official Baseball Guide for information.

INVESTIGATE THE TEAM ROSTER:

Recent Recruits– Who's coming in with you. Is the coach stockpiling players at your position?

Past Roster Patterns– How many Junior College players are on the roster and what is the ratio of upperclassmen to lower classmen?

How many players are at your position and what year are they?

Where are the players from? (This indicates how the coach focuses his recruiting efforts.)

Playing Time? Check underclassmen statistics to see how much playing time they had received


CRITERIA FOR SELECTING A COLLEGE:
Location
Size of School
Cost to Attend
Social Life
Academic Reputation
Areas of Study
FACTORS IN ACCEPTING AN OFFER
Distance from Home? Do you want to watch your son play a lot and will your son become homesick?
Family's financial situation
Playing Time
Is the school the right place without baseball?
What size college do you want?
Do you like the Coaching Staff?
The off-season conditioning and training facilities
What kind of community support do they have?


CONTACTING COLLEGE COACHES:
Begin your initial contact letter with the coaches last name in the salutation. 95% of all letters that start, Dear Coach, are thrown into the trash can.
Player should write the letter yourself. If your handwriting is bad then type the letter.
Players should return all questionnaires to ALL schools that contact them even if they are not interested. Remember, Coaches talk to other coaches!
Players should fill out their own questionnaire. Coaches can tell if your parents wrote it.
Keep your contact letter brief– if you write too much, they will not look (One Typed Page Maximum)
Do not contact college coaches at their home
Do not lie about your athletic abilities, accomplishments or academic standing.
Do not send your school application to the coach to be processed

QUESTIONS TO ASK AT A COLLEGE VISIT:
What position/role do you see my son in?
What players and what class make up those roles in the upcoming season?
What other recruits make up those roles for the seasons beyond?
What is the total cost to attend school (In State vs. Out of State)?
What is the highest scholarship offer currently on team (Don't Ask for Names)?
What scholarship level do you envision for my son?
How many years has the coaching staff been together?
What's the graduation rate of the baseball program?
Is there a solid academic support team in place to help assist student- athletes?
Can you name some players that have increased their draft status after attending your school?


NCAA Division I:
· 11.7 full scholarships
· Scholarship monies can be divided
· Full scholarships are very rare
· Some lower level Division I schools do not fully fund all 11.7 scholarships
· Blending of athletic and academic scholarship monies is permissible

NCAA Division II:
· 9 full scholarships
· Scholarship monies can be divided
· Full scholarships are very rare
· Many DII programs do not fund all 9 scholarships
· Blending of athletic and academic scholarship monies is permissible

NCAA Division III:
· 0 athletic scholarships available
· Many Division III schools do a very good job of finding the players academic and other aid funding

NAIA:
· 12 full scholarships
· Scholarship monies can be divided
· Some NAIA programs don't fund the 12 scholarships
· Blending of athletic and academic scholarship monies is permissible

NJCAA Division I
· 24 full scholarships including tuition, room and board books and fees
· Blending of athletic and academic scholarship monies is permissible

NJCAA Division II:
· 24 scholarships including tuition and books. No room and board or fees.
· Blending of athletic and academic scholarship monies is permissible

NJCAA Division III:
· 0 athletic scholarships
· These programs are able to field very competitive teams because they are typically very inexpensive to attend

IMPORTANT THINGS TO REMEMBER: 
· A 50% offer is considered a "good offer"
· Most Scholarship money goes to "up the middle" players (Pitchers, Catchers, SS/2B and Centerfielders)
· Two way players generally receive the highest offers
· Know what the offer covers– full tuition, books, room and board, student fees, etc